Report fly-tippers, Hull locals told


Published: Thursday 23rd October 2014 by The News Editor

Comments (4)

A fly-tipping clampdown is seeing local politicians call on residents to report rubbish around Hull.

The city council’s neighbourhood nuisance team, responsible for the environment, is targeting the Avenues area in particular.

It has undertaken patrols of Sharp Street and Suffolk Street next to Newland Avenue following an increase in objection concerning fly-tipping and dog mess.

Mike Ross, a Newland ward councillor, describes it as the top priority for these streets.

The council is staging talks with local landlords about how to stop fly-tipping near their properties.

It is also urging local residents to be vigilant and act as whistleblowers on any litterbugs they see creating eyesores.

This is especially important since collecting sufficient evidence leading to convictions can be challenging.

Additional stickers and signs warning about dog fouling has been put up in the vicinity.

Letters have been circulated to residents in the worst areas warning householders who have rubbish clogging their tenfoots.

The clean-ups are being partially financed by local ward funds.

Copyright Press Association 2014

Published: Thursday 23rd October 2014 by The News Editor

Comments (4)
  • Philip Coggin

    Fly tippers are a scurge on our cities and the county side alike.
    is my opinion that we are far to soft with these morons, since they
    don’t give a fig about others when they spoil our beauty spots and other
    areas then we should when they are caught always fine them the legal

  • Chris Evers

    I have rang 300300 on more then one occasion regarding this issue down the street where I live on Newland Avenue. I have even suggested the placing of CCTV cameras or even simply erecting a sign, suggesting the area is under CCTV surveillance, near the area where these morons dump their waste. Only to be told the council do not do this.
    What does not help is the fact that Hull City Council now do not collect waste as often as they used to from domestic properties, 2 weekly/fortnightly collections are a joke, yet we still pay the same if not more Council Tax for half the service we had a few years ago. On top of this we are told we are allowed only a limited number of large item collections for free!
    Yes I realise we have central government cuts to many councils etc…
    BUT surely this is a problem of the councils own making?

    • Philip Coggin

      I would like to add if I may to your entry, which I absolutely agree with.
      Now we are getting our bins emptied less frequently, why do people still put items in that could be reduced by cutting up or folding to make more room in the bin.
      Many times you see bins waiting to be emptied and the contents could be greatly reduced in size with just a little sense and thought applied.
      Make things smaller and you can get more into the bin and it would also comply with the rule that the bin lid should be closed, therefore restricting items from being blown about.

    • Philip Coggin

      Actually this is not a problem of the councils own making or any other council, sorry to say you cannot put the blame there.
      This problem has arisen because we are fast running out of land fill space and to make the matter worse, people do not want landfill on their doorstep. (I have to go along with that objection)

      Once land has been used for the purpose of burying waste it becomes unusable for many years, and dangerous to use for building purposes.

      Land fill sites smell, cause noise pollution and blown litter is a serious problem, as well as encouraging vermin.
      The cost of land fill has become so prohibitive with regard to cost and siting, hence a reduction in waste, improvements in waste management and a better more concerted effort to recycle.

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