PM’s praise for ‘brilliant’ school


Published: Monday 13th October 2014 by The News Editor

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David Cameron has told parents he wants their sons and daughters to enjoy the same “brilliant” education his children do.

Announcing plans to reform England’s worst schools, the Prime Minister insisted no British youngster should endure “second-rate” schooling.

In an article for the Daily Mail, the Prime Minister reflected on his daughter Florence’s first day at school last month and said she is “excited” to learn.

Mr Cameron and his wife Samantha are reported to have visited a number of state schools in recent weeks to find somewhere for daughter Nancy, 10, to attend next year.

He wrote: ” Taking my four-year-old daughter Florence to school for the first time is something I won’t forget. All parents know that feeling – the apprehension as you let go of your child’s hand and watch them run across the playground towards their new friends. But what gave me peace of mind, what made it a little easier to walk away, was knowing that Florence is being taught at a brilliant state primary school.

“I want for your children what I have for my own, because no child in Britain should be born to have a second-rate education.”

The Prime Minister is announcing a number of reforms that a Conservative government would introduce after the next election to tackle failing schools.

He added: ” We know the ingredients of a great state school: great teachers, great leadership and an intolerance of failure – and freedom for those great teachers. Now we want to go further.

“First, we will get more brilliant teachers into the schools that need them most. With programmes like Teach First, more top graduates are training to be teachers than ever before. But we will go further. A national teaching fellowship will pay the best of the best to work in failing or inadequate schools.

“I want to see 1,500 of these top teachers signed up and in post by 2020. That means two in every school; every child within reach of first-class teaching. We all know the difference good teaching makes. The moment when an interest was sparked, a subject was mastered, or a career was inspired – these turning points can so often be traced back to one special teacher.

” Second, we will get to grips with failing schools. There are still too many in our country – 500 of them teaching 100,000 of our children. Currently there are eight regional school commissioners overseeing all free schools and academies. We will give these experts, who include former teachers, a wider remit: unprecedented powers to overhaul failing schools. If it’s the leadership that’s not working, they can make them remove it – reappointing the whole governing body if they have to. If the curriculum isn’t up to scratch, they can change it.

“They can issue new disciplinary measures for bad behaviour. They can pair up failing schools with good local schools. And if they succeed, we will look at what they can do for schools that are said to ‘require improvement’ – what I call coasting schools.

” When it comes to our children’s education, we don’t have a year to waste. Every day a school fails is a day too long. So these measures will happen fast.

” After her first month at school, Florence is coming home every day repeating things she has heard her teacher say, excited to learn more. It will remain my mission to give every parent that sense of security – the knowledge that their child’s education really is helping them to reach their potential and succeed in life.”

Published: Monday 13th October 2014 by The News Editor

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